Veterinarians

veterinarians
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-Formula Federal Assistance Programs-Specific Administrative Provisions for the Veterinary Services Grants ProgramRule2017-0593103/27/2017Agriculture DepartmentThe National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is publishing a final rule for the Veterinary Services Grants Program. NIFA's development of these regulations serves to enhance its accountability and to standardize procedures … The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is publishing a final rule for the Veterinary Services Grants Program. NIFA's development of these regulations serves to enhance its accountability and to standardize procedures across the Federal assistance programs it administers while providing transparency to the public.competitive-and-noncompetitive-non-formula-federal-assistance-programs-specific-administrativeFR-Doc-2017-05931
Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis; Update of General ProvisionsProposed Rule2015-3151012/16/2015Agriculture DepartmentWe are proposing to consolidate the regulations governing bovine tuberculosis, and those governing brucellosis. As part of this consolidation, we are proposing to transition the tuberculosis and brucellosis programs away from a State c … We are proposing to consolidate the regulations governing bovine tuberculosis, and those governing brucellosis. As part of this consolidation, we are proposing to transition the tuberculosis and brucellosis programs away from a State classification system based in disease prevalence. Instead, States and Tribes would implement animal health plans that identify sources of the diseases within the State or Tribal lands and specify mitigations to address the risk posed by those sources. The consolidated regulations would also set forth standards for surveillance, epidemiological investigations, and affected herd management that must be incorporated into each animal health plan, with certain limited exceptions; would provide revised conditions for the interstate movement of cattle, bison, and captive cervids; and would provide revised conditions for APHIS approval of tests, testing laboratories, and testers for bovine tuberculosis or brucellosis. Finally, we are proposing to revise the bovine tuberculosis- and brucellosis-related import requirements for cattle and bison to make these requirements clearer and assure that they more effectively mitigate the risk of introduction of these diseases into the United States.brucellosis-and-bovine-tuberculosis-update-of-general-provisionsFR-Doc-2015-31510
National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing Accredited Duties and Electing To ParticipateRule2011-2152608/23/2011Agriculture DepartmentWe are announcing to the public that veterinarians who are currently accredited in the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue to perform accredited duties and may elect to continue to participate in the NVAP unt … We are announcing to the public that veterinarians who are currently accredited in the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue to perform accredited duties and may elect to continue to participate in the NVAP until October 1, 2011. The regulations indicate that currently accredited veterinarians must elect to continue their participation in the NVAP in order to maintain their accredited status, after which we will confirm their continued participation and notify them of their first renewal date. A previous document announced that currently accredited veterinarians may continue to perform accredited duties until further notice, even if they have not received a date for their first accreditation renewal. That document stated that we would specify a date by which veterinarians would have to elect to participate in a subsequent document.national-veterinary-accreditation-program-currently-accredited-veterinarians-performing-accreditedFR-Doc-2011-21526
National Veterinary Accreditation ProgramRuleE9-2925312/09/2009Agriculture DepartmentWe are amending the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program to establish two accreditation categories in place of the former single category, to add requirements for supplemental training and renewal of ac … We are amending the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program to establish two accreditation categories in place of the former single category, to add requirements for supplemental training and renewal of accreditation, and to offer program certifications. We are making these changes in order to support the Agency's animal health safeguarding initiatives, to involve accredited veterinarians in integrated surveillance activities, and to make the provisions governing our National Veterinary Accreditation Program more uniform and consistent. These changes will increase the level of training and skill of accredited veterinarians in the areas of disease prevention and preparedness for animal health emergencies in the United States.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2009/12/09/E9-29253/national-veterinary-accreditation-programFR-Doc-E9-29253
Trichinae Certification ProgramRuleE8-2367810/10/2008Agriculture DepartmentWe are amending the regulations to establish a voluntary Trichinae Certification Program for U.S. pork that has been produced under disease-prevention conditions. Under the program, we will certify pork production sites that fol … We are amending the regulations to establish a voluntary Trichinae Certification Program for U.S. pork that has been produced under disease-prevention conditions. Under the program, we will certify pork production sites that follow prescribed good production practices that reduce, eliminate, or avoid the risk of exposure of swine to zoonotic parasites of the genus Trichinella. Such a program should enhance the ability of producers to export pork and pork products to overseas markets. This program has been developed as a cooperative effort by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Pork Board, and the pork processing industry. This program will include those producers who choose to participate in the program, as well as slaughter facilities and other persons that handle or process swine from pork production sites that have been certified under the program.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2008/10/10/E8-23678/trichinae-certification-programFR-Doc-E8-23678
Trichinae Certification ProgramProposed RuleE7-923605/16/2007Agriculture DepartmentWe are proposing to establish a voluntary Trichinae Certification Program for U.S. pork that has been produced under disease-prevention conditions. Under the proposed program, we would certify pork production sites that follow prescri … We are proposing to establish a voluntary Trichinae Certification Program for U.S. pork that has been produced under disease-prevention conditions. Under the proposed program, we would certify pork production sites that follow prescribed good production practices that reduce, eliminate, or avoid the risk of exposure of animals to the zoonotic parasite Trichinella spiralis, a disease of swine. Such a program should enhance the ability of producers to export pork and pork products to overseas markets. This proposed program, which would be funded by program fees, has been developed as a cooperative effort by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Pork Board, and the pork processing industry. If adopted, this program would include those producers who choose to participate in the program, as well as slaughter facilities and other persons that handle or process swine from pork production sites that have been certified under the program.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2007/05/16/E7-9236/trichinae-certification-programFR-Doc-E7-9236
National Veterinary Accreditation ProgramProposed RuleE7-325602/27/2007Agriculture DepartmentWe are proposing four changes related to our proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 1, 2006, that would amend the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program. The June 2006 proposed rule … We are proposing four changes related to our proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 1, 2006, that would amend the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program. The June 2006 proposed rule would establish two accreditation categories in place of the current single category, add requirements for supplemental training and renewal of accreditation, and offer accreditation specializations. In this supplemental proposed rule, we are proposing to adjust the scope of the two accreditation categories; to require initial accreditation training for veterinarians seeking accreditation; to require newly accredited veterinarians to renew their accreditation 3 years after completing initial accreditation training; and to reduce the training required for renewal of accreditation from the amount discussed in the June 2006 proposal.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2007/02/27/E7-3256/national-veterinary-accreditation-programFR-Doc-E7-3256
National Veterinary Accreditation ProgramProposed RuleE6-849306/01/2006Agriculture DepartmentWe are proposing to amend the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program to establish two accreditation categories in place of the current single category, to add requirements for supplemental training and rene … We are proposing to amend the regulations regarding the National Veterinary Accreditation Program to establish two accreditation categories in place of the current single category, to add requirements for supplemental training and renewal of accreditation, and to offer accreditation specializations. We are proposing these changes in order to support the Agency's animal health safeguarding initiatives, to involve accredited veterinarians in integrated surveillance activities, and to make the provisions governing our National Veterinary Accreditation Program more uniform and consistent. These proposed changes would increase the level of training and skill of accredited veterinarians in the areas of disease prevention and preparedness for animal health emergencies in the United States.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2006/06/01/E6-8493/national-veterinary-accreditation-programFR-Doc-E6-8493
Animal Health Protection Act; Revisions to Authority CitationsRule03-305802/07/2003Agriculture DepartmentWe are amending the regulations in title 7, chapter III, and title 9, chapter I, to reflect the enactment of the Animal Health Protection Act (Pub. L. 107-171, 116 Stat. 494, 7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) in our lists of legal authorities. W … We are amending the regulations in title 7, chapter III, and title 9, chapter I, to reflect the enactment of the Animal Health Protection Act (Pub. L. 107-171, 116 Stat. 494, 7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) in our lists of legal authorities. We are also removing or revising citations and references to animal health statutes that were repealed by the Animal Health Protection Act. In addition, we are updating the authority citations throughout our regulations in titles 7 and 9, where appropriate, to remove duplicative or outdated citations and are making other nonsubstantive editorial changes in the regulations for the sake of clarity.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2003/02/07/03-3058/animal-health-protection-act-revisions-to-authority-citationsFR-Doc-03-3058
Origin Health Certificates for Livestock Exported From the United StatesRule02-626603/15/2002Agriculture DepartmentWe are amending the regulations pertaining to animal exports and the standards for accredited veterinarians to allow origin health certificates for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for more than 30 … We are amending the regulations pertaining to animal exports and the standards for accredited veterinarians to allow origin health certificates for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for more than 30 days in some cases, depending on the testing requirements of the country of destination. This change will align our requirements for export origin health certificates with the testing requirements of importing countries. This action will eliminate the need for exporters to obtain another certificate when animals arrive at the port of embarkation after more than 30 days have elapsed, thereby reducing costs and delays for U.S. livestock exporters who ship animals to certain countries. This change will not increase the risk of infected or exposed animals being exported, since all animals are inspected an additional time before leaving the United States.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2002/03/15/02-6266/origin-health-certificates-for-livestock-exported-from-the-united-statesFR-Doc-02-6266
Origin Health Certificates for Livestock Exported From the United StatesProposed Rule00-949204/17/2000Agriculture DepartmentWe are proposing to amend the animal export regulations to allow origin health certificates issued for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for longer than 30 days in some cases, based on the requirement … We are proposing to amend the animal export regulations to allow origin health certificates issued for animals intended for export from the United States to be valid for longer than 30 days in some cases, based on the requirements of the country of destination. Currently, origin health certificates for animals intended for export from the United States must certify that the animals were inspected within the 30 days prior to the movement for export. They must also contain information about any tests required to be conducted prior to export. Generally, the animals are inspected and tested (or samples are taken for testing) on the same day. However, some countries require or allow testing to be conducted more than 30 days prior to the date of export. This action would allow animals to be inspected for the origin health certificate as early as the required testing or sampling may be performed, in accordance with the requirements of the country of destination. We believe this can be allowed without increasing the risk of infected or exposed animals being exported, since all livestock leaving the United States by sea or air are inspected again by a U.S. Department of Agriculture veterinarian within 24 hours of export; and animals exported to Canada or Mexico by land are inspected by those nations prior to crossing the land border. This action would simplify the export process and reduce costs for exporters.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2000/04/17/00-9492/origin-health-certificates-for-livestock-exported-from-the-united-statesFR-Doc-00-9492
Leave a Reply