United States Investments Abroad

united-states-investments-abroad
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Alternatives to References to Credit Ratings With Respect to Permissible Activities for Foreign Branches of Insured State Nonmember Banks and Pledge of Assets by Insured Domestic Branches of Foreign BanksProposed Rule2016-1509606/28/2016Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is seeking public comment on a proposed rule to amend its international banking regulations (``Part 347'') consistent with section 939A (``section 939A'') of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (``Do … The FDIC is seeking public comment on a proposed rule to amend its international banking regulations (``Part 347'') consistent with section 939A (``section 939A'') of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (``Dodd-Frank Act'') and the FDIC's authority under section 5(c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (``FDI Act''). Section 939A directs each federal agency to review and modify regulations that reference credit ratings. The proposed rule would amend the provisions of subparts A and B of Part 347 that reference credit ratings. Subpart A, which sets forth the FDIC's requirements for insured state nonmember banks that operate foreign branches, would be amended to replace references to credit ratings in the definition of ``investment grade'' with a standard of creditworthiness that has been adopted in other federal regulations that conform with section 939A. Subpart B would be amended to revise the FDIC's asset pledge requirement for insured U.S. branches of foreign banks. The eligibility criteria for the types of assets that foreign banks may pledge would be amended by replacing the references to credit ratings with the revised definition of ``investment grade.'' The proposed rule would apply this investment grade standard to each type of pledgeable asset, establish a liquidity requirement for such assets, and subject them to a fair value discount. The proposed rule would also introduce cash as a new asset type that foreign banks may pledge under subpart B and create a separate asset category expressly for debt securities issued by government sponsored enterprises.alternatives-to-references-to-credit-ratings-with-respect-to-permissible-activities-for-foreignFR-Doc-2016-15096
Expanded Examination Cycle for Certain Small Insured Depository Institutions and U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign BanksRule2016-0387702/29/2016Treasury DepartmentThe OCC, Board, and FDIC (collectively, the agencies) are jointly issuing and requesting public comment on interim final rules to implement section 83001 of the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), which was enacted … The OCC, Board, and FDIC (collectively, the agencies) are jointly issuing and requesting public comment on interim final rules to implement section 83001 of the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act), which was enacted on December 4, 2015. Section 83001 of the FAST Act permits the agencies to examine qualifying insured depository institutions with less than $1 billion in total assets no less than once during each 18-month period. Prior to enactment of the FAST Act, only qualifying insured depository institutions with less than $500 million in total assets were eligible for an 18-month on-site examination cycle. The interim final rules generally would allow well capitalized and well managed institutions with less than $1 billion in total assets to benefit from the extended 18-month examination schedule. In addition, the interim final rules make parallel changes to the agencies' regulations governing the on-site examination cycle for U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks, consistent with the International Banking Act of 1978. Finally, the FDIC is integrating its regulations regarding the frequency of safety and soundness examinations for State nonmember banks and State savings associations.expanded-examination-cycle-for-certain-small-insured-depository-institutions-and-us-branches-andFR-Doc-2016-03877
Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Capital Adequacy, Transition Provisions, Prompt Corrective Action, Standardized Approach for Risk-weighted Assets, Market Discipline and Disclosure Requirements, Advanced Approaches Risk-Based Capital Rule, and Market Risk Capital RuleRule2013-2053609/10/2013Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is adopting an interim final rule that revises its risk-based and leverage capital requirements for FDIC-supervised institutions. This interim final rule is substantially identical to … The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is adopting an interim final rule that revises its risk-based and leverage capital requirements for FDIC-supervised institutions. This interim final rule is substantially identical to a joint final rule issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) (together, with the FDIC, the agencies). The interim final rule consolidates three separate notices of proposed rulemaking that the agencies jointly published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2012, with selected changes. The interim final rule implements a revised definition of regulatory capital, a new common equity tier 1 minimum capital requirement, a higher minimum tier 1 capital requirement, and, for FDIC-supervised institutions subject to the advanced approaches risk-based capital rules, a supplementary leverage ratio that incorporates a broader set of exposures in the denominator. The interim final rule incorporates these new requirements into the FDIC's prompt corrective action (PCA) framework. In addition, the interim final rule establishes limits on FDIC-supervised institutions' capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if the FDIC-supervised institution does not hold a specified amount of common equity tier 1 capital in addition to the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements. The interim final rule amends the methodologies for determining risk-weighted assets for all FDIC-supervised institutions. The interim final rule also adopts changes to the FDIC's regulatory capital requirements that meet the requirements of section 171 and section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. The interim final rule also codifies the FDIC's regulatory capital rules, which have previously resided in various appendices to their respective regulations, into a harmonized integrated regulatory framework. In addition, the FDIC is amending the market risk capital rule (market risk rule) to apply to state savings associations. The FDIC is issuing these revisions to its capital regulations as an interim final rule. The FDIC invites comments on the interaction of this rule with other proposed leverage ratio requirements applicable to large, systemically important banking organizations. This interim final rule otherwise contains regulatory text that is identical to the common rule text adopted as a final rule by the Federal Reserve and the OCC. This interim final rule enables the FDIC to proceed on a unified, expedited basis with the other federal banking agencies pending consideration of other issues. Specifically, the FDIC intends to evaluate this interim final rule in the context of the proposed well- capitalized and buffer levels of the supplementary leverage ratio applicable to large, systemically important banking organizations, as described in a separate Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) published in the Federal Register August 20, 2013. The FDIC is seeking commenters' views on the interaction of this interim final rule with the proposed rule regarding the supplementary leverage ratio for large, systemically important banking organizations.regulatory-capital-rules-regulatory-capital-implementation-of-basel-iii-capital-adequacy-transitionFR-Doc-2013-20536
International Services Surveys and Direct Investment Surveys ReportingRule2012-984904/24/2012Commerce DepartmentThe Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) revises its rules to establish general guidelines for how BEA will collect data on international trade in services and direct investment surveys, which are provided for by the International Inve … The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) revises its rules to establish general guidelines for how BEA will collect data on international trade in services and direct investment surveys, which are provided for by the International Investment and Trade in Services Survey Act (the Act). In addition to the Act, the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 authorizes BEA to conduct international trade in services surveys. Currently, international trade in services and direct investment surveys are promulgated through separate rulemaking actions. This final rule modifies BEA's regulations to allow BEA to issue surveys through notices rather than through notice and comment rulemaking. It also provides a more general framework for how BEA collects data on these surveys that are required, or provided for, by the statutes. This rule will simplify and generalize existing regulations governing the procurement of information on international trade in services and direct investment.international-services-surveys-and-direct-investment-surveys-reportingFR-Doc-2012-9849
International Emergency Economic Powers Act Civil and Criminal PenaltiesRuleE8-1238506/10/2008Treasury DepartmentThe Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is amending its regulations to reflect amendments to the penalty provisions of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (``IEEPA'') made by the International … The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is amending its regulations to reflect amendments to the penalty provisions of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (``IEEPA'') made by the International Emergency Economic Powers Enhancement Act (the ``Act'').https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2008/06/10/E8-12385/international-emergency-economic-powers-act-civil-and-criminal-penaltiesFR-Doc-E8-12385
Expanded Examination Cycle for Certain Small Insured Depository Institutions and U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign BanksRule07-471609/25/2007Treasury DepartmentThe OCC, Board, FDIC, and OTS (collectively, the Agencies) are jointly adopting as final the interim rules issued on April 10, 2007, that implemented section 605 of the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2006 (FSRRA) and r … The OCC, Board, FDIC, and OTS (collectively, the Agencies) are jointly adopting as final the interim rules issued on April 10, 2007, that implemented section 605 of the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2006 (FSRRA) and related legislation (collectively the Examination Amendments). The Examination Amendments permit insured depository institutions (institutions) that have up to $500 million in total assets, and that meet certain other criteria, to qualify for an 18-month (rather than 12-month) on-site examination cycle. Prior to enactment of FSRRA, only institutions with less than $250 million in total assets were eligible for an 18-month on-site examination cycle. The interim rules made parallel changes to the Agencies' regulations governing the on-site examination cycle for U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks (foreign bank offices), consistent with the International Banking Act of 1978 (IBA). In addition to implementing the changes in the Examination Amendments, the interim rules clarified when a small insured depository institution is considered ``well managed'' for purposes of qualifying for an 18-month examination cycle.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2007/09/25/07-4716/expanded-examination-cycle-for-certain-small-insured-depository-institutions-and-us-branches-andFR-Doc-07-4716
Expanded Examination Cycle for Certain Small Insured Depository Institutions and U.S. Branches and Agencies of Foreign BanksRule07-171604/10/2007Treasury DepartmentThe OCC, Board, FDIC, and OTS (collectively, the Agencies) are jointly issuing and requesting public comment on these interim rules to implement the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2006 (FSRRA) and related legislatio … The OCC, Board, FDIC, and OTS (collectively, the Agencies) are jointly issuing and requesting public comment on these interim rules to implement the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2006 (FSRRA) and related legislation (collectively the Examination Amendments). The Examination Amendments permit insured depository institutions (institutions) that have up to $500 million in total assets, and that meet certain other criteria, to qualify for an 18-month (rather than 12-month) on-site examination cycle. Prior to enactment of FSRRA, only institutions with less than $250 million in total assets were eligible for an 18-month on-site examination cycle. The OCC, Board, and FDIC are making parallel changes to their regulations governing the on-site examination cycle for U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks (foreign bank offices), consistent with the International Banking Act of 1978 (IBA). In addition to implementing the changes in the Examination Amendments, the Agencies are clarifying when a small insured depository institution is considered ``well managed'' for purposes of qualifying for an 18-month examination cycle.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2007/04/10/07-1716/expanded-examination-cycle-for-certain-small-insured-depository-institutions-and-us-branches-andFR-Doc-07-1716
Revisions To Reflect the Merger of the Bank Insurance Fund and the Savings Association Insurance FundRule06-372104/21/2006Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is amending its regulations to reflect the recent merger of the Bank Insurance Fund and the Savings Association Insurance Fund, forming the Deposit Insurance Fund. The merger of the two deposit insurance funds was required by … The FDIC is amending its regulations to reflect the recent merger of the Bank Insurance Fund and the Savings Association Insurance Fund, forming the Deposit Insurance Fund. The merger of the two deposit insurance funds was required by the Federal Deposit Insurance Reform Act of 2005 and was effectuated by the FDIC as of March 31, 2006. All revisions to the FDIC's regulations made by the final rule are conforming changes necessitated by the funds merger.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2006/04/21/06-3721/revisions-to-reflect-the-merger-of-the-bank-insurance-fund-and-the-savings-association-insuranceFR-Doc-06-3721
International BankingRule05-629504/06/2005Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is amending its international banking regulations in subpart J of part 303 and revising subparts A and B of part 347. The amendments reorganize, clarify, and revise subparts A and B of part 347, and address various issues ra … The FDIC is amending its international banking regulations in subpart J of part 303 and revising subparts A and B of part 347. The amendments reorganize, clarify, and revise subparts A and B of part 347, and address various issues raised as part of the FDIC's ongoing effort under the Economic Growth and Regulatory Paperwork Reduction Act of 1996 (12 U.S.C. 3311). Included in the revisions are amendments that address relocation of insured U.S. branches of foreign banks within and outside the state where such branches are presently located, adoption of a risk-based asset pledge requirement for insured U.S. branches of foreign banks, and information and examination requirements for foreign banks that own branches or depository institution subsidiaries seeking FDIC deposit insurance. The FDIC has also decided to maintain its existing position concerning the availability of FDIC deposit insurance for wholesale U.S. branches of foreign banks.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2005/04/06/05-6295/international-bankingFR-Doc-05-6295
Direct Investment Surveys: BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad-2004Proposed Rule04-1864008/17/2004Commerce DepartmentThis proposed rule amends regulations of the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Department of Commerce (BEA) to set forth the reporting requirements for the BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad. The BE-10 survey is con … This proposed rule amends regulations of the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Department of Commerce (BEA) to set forth the reporting requirements for the BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad. The BE-10 survey is conducted once every 5 years and covers virtually the entire universe of U.S. direct investment abroad in terms of value. The benchmark survey will be conducted for 2004. To address the current needs of data users while at the same time keeping the respondent burden as low as possible, BEA proposes modification, addition, or deletion of several items on the survey forms and in the reporting criteria. Changes are proposed to make the survey more consistent with the surveys of direct investment in the United States and more consistent with its annual and quarterly counterparts. Changes proposed by BEA in the reporting requirements to be implemented in this proposed rule are: (a) Increasing the exemption level for reporting on the BE-10B(SF) short form from $7 million to $25 million and on the BE-10B Bank form from $7 million to $10 million; (b) increasing the exemption level for reporting on the BE-10B(LF) long form from $100 million to $150 million; and (c) increasing the exemption level for reporting only selected items on the BE-10A form from $100 million to $150 million. In conjunction with these increases in exemption levels, BEA proposes to introduce an abbreviated short form, Form BE-10B Mini, for reporting nonbank foreign affiliates with assets, sales or gross operating revenues, and net income (loss) less than or equal to $25 million but greater than $10 million.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2004/08/17/04-18640/direct-investment-surveys-be-10-benchmark-survey-of-us-direct-investment-abroad-2004FR-Doc-04-18640
International BankingProposed Rule04-1575707/19/2004Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is publishing for notice and comment proposed amendments to subpart J of part 303 on international banking and revisions to subpart A of part 347, relating to the international activities and investments of insured state n … The FDIC is publishing for notice and comment proposed amendments to subpart J of part 303 on international banking and revisions to subpart A of part 347, relating to the international activities and investments of insured state nonmember banks, and subpart B of part 347, relating principally to insured and noninsured U.S. branches of foreign banks. The proposed amendments address the relocation of grandfathered insured branches. They also reorganize, clarify, and revise subparts A and B of part 347, and address various issues raised as part of the FDIC's ongoing effort under the Economic Growth and Regulatory Paperwork Reduction Act of 1996 (12 U.S.C. 3311) to address regulatory burden issues. Included in the revisions affecting grandfathered insured branches are revisions to the FDIC's asset pledge requirement to establish a risk-based system and revision of the FDIC's asset maintenance requirement to calculate the asset maintenance percentage based on the daily third-party liabilities of the branch. In addition, the FDIC is proposing to strengthen FDIC's supervisory processes and make conforming amendments for other FDIC rules as part of the proposal. The FDIC is also requesting comments, as part of this document, on whether deposits in wholesale U.S. branches of foreign banks should be covered by deposit insurance and on the accounting rules contained in subpart C of part 347.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2004/07/19/04-15757/international-bankingFR-Doc-04-15757
Filing Procedures, Corporate Powers, International Banking, Management Official Interlocks, Golden Parachute and Indemnification PaymentsRule03-2045108/21/2003Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC has adopted a final rule amending its procedures relating to filings, mutual to stock conversions, international banking, management official interlocks and golden parachute payments. The changes are mostly technical in nature … The FDIC has adopted a final rule amending its procedures relating to filings, mutual to stock conversions, international banking, management official interlocks and golden parachute payments. The changes are mostly technical in nature or clarify previous FDIC positions; however, the final rule includes a waiver provision to its regulations. The waiver provision grants discretionary power to the FDIC Board of Directors to waive regulatory provisions that are not based on statutory requirements.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2003/08/21/03-20451/filing-procedures-corporate-powers-international-banking-management-official-interlocks-goldenFR-Doc-03-20451
Filing Procedures, Corporate Powers, International Banking, Management Official InterlocksProposed Rule02-3192112/27/2002Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationThe FDIC is proposing to amend its regulations governing filing procedures, international banking and management official interlocks by making technical corrections and modifications to clarify existing policies and procedures. In ad … The FDIC is proposing to amend its regulations governing filing procedures, international banking and management official interlocks by making technical corrections and modifications to clarify existing policies and procedures. In addition, the FDIC is proposing to add a waiver provision to its regulations. As part of its regulatory review effort, the FDIC also solicits public comment to identify any areas of its filing procedures regulation that are outdated, unnecessary, or unduly burdensome, and whether the regulation should be continued without change, amended or rescinded to minimize any significant economic impact it may have on a substantial number of small insured institutions (i.e., those with assets of $150 million or less).https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2002/12/27/02-31921/filing-procedures-corporate-powers-international-banking-management-official-interlocksFR-Doc-02-31921
Direct Investment Surveys: BE-577, Direct Transactions of U.S. Reporter With Foreign AffiliateRule00-3209012/18/2000Commerce DepartmentThese final rules amend the reporting requirements for the quarterly BE-577, Direct Transactions of U.S. Reporter With Foreign Affiliate. The BE-577 survey is a mandatory survey and is conducted quarterly by the Bureau of Economic A … These final rules amend the reporting requirements for the quarterly BE-577, Direct Transactions of U.S. Reporter With Foreign Affiliate. The BE-577 survey is a mandatory survey and is conducted quarterly by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce, under the International Investment and Trade in Services Survey Act. BEA will send BE-577 survey forms to potential respondents each quarter; responses will be due within 30 days after the close of each fiscal quarter, except for the final quarter of the fiscal year, when reports should be filed within 45 days. The survey is a cut-off sample survey that obtains data on transactions and positions between U.S.- owned foreign business enterprises and their U.S. parents. These final rules increase the exemption level for the survey--the level at or below which reports are not required--from $20 million to $30 million in total assets, sales or gross operating revenues, and net income (positive or negative) of the U.S.-owned foreign business enterprise. This change will reduce the number of respondents that otherwise must report in the survey, thus reducing respondent burden, particularly for small companies.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2000/12/18/00-32090/direct-investment-surveys-be-577-direct-transactions-of-us-reporter-with-foreign-affiliateFR-Doc-00-32090
Direct Investment Surveys: BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment AbroadRule00-3208912/18/2000Commerce DepartmentThese final rules amend the reporting requirements for the BE- 11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad. The BE-11 survey is a mandatory survey and is conducted annually by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Depa … These final rules amend the reporting requirements for the BE- 11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad. The BE-11 survey is a mandatory survey and is conducted annually by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), U.S. Department of Commerce, under the International Investment and Trade in Services Survey Act. BEA will send the annual survey to potential respondents in March of each year; responses will be due by May 31. The last BE-11 annual survey was conducted for 1998. (A BE-11 survey is not conducted in a year, such as 1999, when a BE-10 Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad is conducted.) The survey is a cut-off sample survey that obtains financial and operating data covering the overall operations of nonbank U.S. parent companies and their nonbank foreign affiliates. These final rules increase the exemption level for reporting on the BE-11B(SF) short form and the BE-11C form from $20 million to $30 million; increase the exemption level for reporting on the BE-11B(LF) long form from $50 million to $100 million; and direct U.S. Reporters with total assets, sales or gross operating revenues, and net income less than or equal to $100 million (positive or negative) to report only selected items on the BE-11A form. These changes will reduce the number of reports that otherwise must be filed, thus reducing respondent burden, particularly for small companies.https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2000/12/18/00-32089/direct-investment-surveys-be-11-annual-survey-of-us-direct-investment-abroadFR-Doc-00-32089
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