health-statistics

[xt_go_advt_1]
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgencyAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgencyAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Clarification of Employer's Continuing Obligation To Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of Each Recordable Injury and IllnessRule2017-0875405/03/2017DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentUnder the Congressional Review Act, Congress has passed, and the President has signed, Public Law 115-21, a resolution of disapproval of OSHA's final rule titled, ``Clarification of Employer's Continuing Obligation to Make and Maintain … Under the Congressional Review Act, Congress has passed, and the President has signed, Public Law 115-21, a resolution of disapproval of OSHA's final rule titled, ``Clarification of Employer's Continuing Obligation to Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of each Recordable Injury and Illness.'' OSHA published the rule, which contained various amendments to OSHA's recordkeeping regulations, on December 19, 2016. The amendments became effective on January 18, 2017. Because Public Law 115-21 invalidates the amendments to OSHA's recordkeeping regulations contained in the rule promulgated on December 19, 2016, OSHA is hereby removing those amendments from the Code of Federal Regulations.clarification-of-employers-continuing-obligation-to-make-and-maintain-an-accurate-record-of-eachFR-Doc-2017-08754
Clarification of Employer's Continuing Obligation To Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of Each Recordable Injury and IllnessRule2016-3041012/19/2016DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is amending its recordkeeping regulations to clarify that the duty to make and maintain accurate records of work-related injuries and illnesses is an ongoing obligation. The duty to record an injury or illness continues for as l … OSHA is amending its recordkeeping regulations to clarify that the duty to make and maintain accurate records of work-related injuries and illnesses is an ongoing obligation. The duty to record an injury or illness continues for as long as the employer must keep records of the recordable injury or illness; the duty does not expire just because the employer fails to create the necessary records when first required to do so. The amendments consist of revisions to the titles of some existing sections and subparts and changes to the text of some existing provisions. The amendments add no new compliance obligations and do not require employers to make records of any injuries or illnesses for which records are not currently required to be made. The amendments in this rule are adopted in response to a decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In that case, a majority held that the Occupational Safety and Health Act does not permit OSHA to impose a continuing recordkeeping obligation on employers. One judge filed a concurring opinion disagreeing with this reading of the statute, but finding that the text of OSHA's recordkeeping regulations did not impose continuing recordkeeping duties. OSHA disagrees with the majority's reading of the law, but agrees that its recordkeeping regulations were not clear with respect to the continuing nature of employers' recordkeeping obligations. This final rule is designed to clarify the regulations in advance of possible future federal court litigation that could further develop the law on the statutory issues addressed in the D.C. Circuit's decision.clarification-of-employers-continuing-obligation-to-make-and-maintain-an-accurate-record-of-eachFR-Doc-2016-30410
Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and IllnessesRule2016-1044305/12/2016DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is issuing a final rule to revise its Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses regulation. The final rule requires employers in certain industries to electronically submit to OSHA injury and illness data that em … OSHA is issuing a final rule to revise its Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses regulation. The final rule requires employers in certain industries to electronically submit to OSHA injury and illness data that employers are already required to keep under existing OSHA regulations. The frequency and content of these establishment-specific submissions is set out in the final rule and is dependent on the size and industry of the employer. OSHA intends to post the data from these submissions on a publicly accessible Web site. OSHA does not intend to post any information on the Web site that could be used to identify individual employees. The final rule also amends OSHA's recordkeeping regulation to update requirements on how employers inform employees to report work- related injuries and illnesses to their employer. The final rule requires employers to inform employees of their right to report work- related injuries and illnesses free from retaliation; clarifies the existing implicit requirement that an employer's procedure for reporting work-related injuries and illnesses must be reasonable and not deter or discourage employees from reporting; and incorporates the existing statutory prohibition on retaliating against employees for reporting work-related injuries or illnesses. The final rule also amends OSHA's existing recordkeeping regulation to clarify the rights of employees and their representatives to access the injury and illness records.improve-tracking-of-workplace-injuries-and-illnessesFR-Doc-2016-10443
Clarification of Employer's Continuing Obligation To Make and Maintain an Accurate Record of Each Recordable Injury and IllnessProposed Rule2015-1800307/29/2015DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is proposing to amend its recordkeeping regulations to clarify that the duty to make and maintain accurate records of work- related injuries and illnesses is an ongoing obligation. The duty to record an injury or illness continues … OSHA is proposing to amend its recordkeeping regulations to clarify that the duty to make and maintain accurate records of work- related injuries and illnesses is an ongoing obligation. The duty to record an injury or illness continues for as long as the employer must keep records of the recordable injury or illness; the duty does not expire just because the employer fails to create the necessary records when first required to do so. The proposed amendments consist of revisions to the titles of some existing sections and subparts, and changes to the text of some existing provisions. The proposed amendments add no new compliance obligations; the proposal would not require employers to make records of any injuries or illnesses for which records are not currently required to be made.clarification-of-employers-continuing-obligation-to-make-and-maintain-an-accurate-record-of-eachFR-Doc-2015-18003
Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements-NAICS Update and Reporting RevisionsRule2014-2151409/18/2014DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is issuing a final rule to update the appendix to its Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting regulation. The appendix contains a list of industries that are partially exempt from requirements to keep records of work-related in … OSHA is issuing a final rule to update the appendix to its Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting regulation. The appendix contains a list of industries that are partially exempt from requirements to keep records of work-related injuries and illnesses due to relatively low occupational injury and illness rates. The updated appendix is based on more recent injury and illness data and lists industry groups classified by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The current appendix lists industries classified by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). The final rule also revises the requirements for reporting work- related fatality, injury, and illness information to OSHA. The current regulation requires employers to report work-related fatalities and in- patient hospitalizations of three or more employees within eight hours of the event. The final rule retains the requirement for employers to report work-related fatalities to OSHA within eight hours of the event but amends the regulation to require employers to report all work- related in-patient hospitalizations, as well as amputations and losses of an eye, to OSHA within 24 hours of the event.occupational-injury-and-illness-recording-and-reporting-requirements-naics-update-and-reportingFR-Doc-2014-21514
Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and IllnessesProposed Rule2013-2671111/08/2013DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentThe purpose of this rulemaking is to improve workplace safety and health through the collection of useful, accessible, establishment- specific injury and illness data to which OSHA currently does not have direct, timely, and systemat … The purpose of this rulemaking is to improve workplace safety and health through the collection of useful, accessible, establishment- specific injury and illness data to which OSHA currently does not have direct, timely, and systematic access. With the information acquired through this proposed rule, employers, employees, employee representatives, the government, and researchers will be better able to identify and abate workplace hazards. OSHA is proposing to amend its recordkeeping regulations to add requirements for the electronic submission of injury and illness information employers are already required to keep under OSHA's regulations for recording and reporting occupational injuries and illnesses. The proposed rule amends the regulation on the annual OSHA injury and illness survey of ten or more employers to add three new electronic reporting requirements. The proposed rule does not add to or change any employer's obligation to complete and retain injury and illness records under OSHA's regulations for recording and reporting occupational injuries and illnesses. The proposed rule also does not add to or change the recording criteria or definitions for these records. The proposed rule only modifies employers' obligations to transmit information from these records to OSHA or OSHA's designee.improve-tracking-of-workplace-injuries-and-illnessesFR-Doc-2013-26711
Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements-NAICS Update and Reporting RevisionsProposed Rule2011-1527706/22/2011DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is proposing to update Appendix A to Subpart B of its Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting regulation. Appendix A contains a list of industries that are partially exempt from maintaining records of occupational injuries and … OSHA is proposing to update Appendix A to Subpart B of its Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting regulation. Appendix A contains a list of industries that are partially exempt from maintaining records of occupational injuries and illnesses, generally due to their relatively low rates of occupational injury and illness. The current list of industries is based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. In 1997, the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) was introduced to classify establishments by industry. The proposed rule would update Appendix A by replacing it with a list of industries based on NAICS and more recent injury and illness data. The proposed rule would also require employers to report to OSHA, within eight hours, all work-related fatalities and all work-related in-patient hospitalizations; and within 24 hours, all work-related amputations. The current regulation requires an employer to report to OSHA, within eight hours, all work-related fatalities and in-patient hospitalizations of three or more employees.occupational-injury-and-illness-recording-and-reporting-requirements-naics-update-and-reportingFR-Doc-2011-15277
Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting RequirementsProposed Rule2010-201001/29/2010DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentOSHA is proposing to revise its Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting (Recordkeeping) regulation to restore a column to the OSHA 300 Log that employers would use to record work- related musculoskeletal disord … OSHA is proposing to revise its Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting (Recordkeeping) regulation to restore a column to the OSHA 300 Log that employers would use to record work- related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The 2001 Recordkeeping final regulation included an MSD column, but the requirement was deleted before the regulation became effective. This proposed rule would require employers to place a check mark in the MSD column, instead of the column they currently mark, if a case is an MSD that meets the Recordkeeping regulation's general recording requirements.occupational-injury-and-illness-recording-and-reporting-requirementsFR-Doc-2010-2010
Designation of Medically Underserved Populations and Health Professional Shortage AreasProposed RuleE8-364302/29/2008DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESHealth and Human Services DepartmentThis proposed rule would revise and consolidate the criteria and processes for designating medically underserved populations (MUPs) and health professional shortage areas (HPSAs), designations that are used in a wide variety of Federal … This proposed rule would revise and consolidate the criteria and processes for designating medically underserved populations (MUPs) and health professional shortage areas (HPSAs), designations that are used in a wide variety of Federal government programs. These revisions are intended to improve the way underserved areas and populations are designated, by incorporating up-to-date measures of health status and access barriers, eliminating inconsistencies and duplication of effort between the two existing processes. These revisions are intended to reduce the effort and data burden on States and communities by simplifying and automating the designation process as much as possible while maximizing the use of technology. No changes are proposed at this time with respect to the criteria for designating dental and mental health HPSAs. Podiatric, vision care, pharmacy, and veterinary care HPSAs, which are no longer in use, would be abolished under the rules proposed below. Additional background information will be available for review on the web site of the Health Resources and Services Administration: http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/shortage. The methodology is also described in a journal article recently published in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved entitled ``Designating Places and Populations as Medically Underserved: A Proposal for a New Approach'' (Ricketts et al, 2007).https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2008/02/29/E8-3643/designation-of-medically-underserved-populations-and-health-professional-shortage-areasFR-Doc-E8-3643
Occupational Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting RequirementsRule01-72501/19/2001DEPARTMENT OF LABORLabor DepartmentThe Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is revising its rule addressing the recording and reporting of occupational injuries and illnesses (29 CFR parts 1904 and 1952), including the forms employers use to record … The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is revising its rule addressing the recording and reporting of occupational injuries and illnesses (29 CFR parts 1904 and 1952), including the forms employers use to record those injuries and illnesses. The revisions to the final rule will produce more useful injury and illness records, collect better information about the incidence of occupational injuries and illnesses on a national basis, promote improved employee awareness and involvement in the recording and reporting of job-related injuries and illnesses, simplify the injury and illness recordkeeping system for employers, and permit increased use of computers and telecommunications technology for OSHA recordkeeping purposes. This rulemaking completes a larger overall effort to revise Part 1904 of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Two sections of Part 1904 have already been revised in earlier rulemakings. A rule titled Reporting fatalities and multiple hospitalization incidents to OSHA, became effective May 2, 1994 and has been incorporated into this final rule as Sec. 1904.39. A second rule entitled Annual OSHA injury and illness survey of ten or more employers became effective on March 13, 1997 and has been incorporated into this final rule as Sec. 1904.41. The final rule being published today also revises 29 CFR 1952.4, Injury and Illness Recording and Reporting Requirements, which prescribes the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for States that have an occupational safety and health program approved by OSHA under Sec. 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (the ``Act'' or ``OSH Act'').https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2001/01/19/01-725/occupational-injury-and-illness-recording-and-reporting-requirementsFR-Doc-01-725
[xt_go_advt_2]
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *