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TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgencyAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
TitleActionFR DocPublishedAgencyAgency NameExcerptsAbstractHTMLPDF
Incorporation by Reference of ICAO Annex 2; Removal of Outdated North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance SpecificationsRule2017-1767408/22/2017DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis rule better aligns FAA regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with the relevant International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards. The ICAO NAT Region is tra … This rule better aligns FAA regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with the relevant International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards. The ICAO NAT Region is transitioning from the decades-old MNPS navigation specification to a more modern, Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) specification. This rule also incorporates by reference the current version of Annex 2 (``Rules of the Air'') to the Convention on International Civil Aviation (the ``Chicago Convention''), hereinafter referred to as ``ICAO Annex 2,'' in the FAA's regulations.incorporation-by-reference-of-icao-annex-2-removal-of-outdated-north-atlantic-minimum-navigationFR-Doc-2017-17674
Removal of References to Obsolete Navigation Systems; Technical AmendmentRule2017-1551707/25/2017DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is removing references to the obsolete navigation systems Loran, Omega and Consol that currently appear in FAA regulations.The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is removing references to the obsolete navigation systems Loran, Omega and Consol that currently appear in FAA regulations.removal-of-references-to-obsolete-navigation-systems-technical-amendmentFR-Doc-2017-15517
Transparency of Airline Ancillary Service FeesProposed Rule2017-0090401/19/2017DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis SNPRM proposes to require air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket agents to clearly disclose to consumers at all points of sale customer-specific fee information, or itinerary-specific information if a customer elects not … This SNPRM proposes to require air carriers, foreign air carriers, and ticket agents to clearly disclose to consumers at all points of sale customer-specific fee information, or itinerary-specific information if a customer elects not to provide customer-specific information, for a first checked bag, a second checked bag, and one carry-on bag wherever fare and schedule information is provided to consumers. This SNPRM further proposes to require each covered carrier to provide useable, current, and accurate (but not transactable) baggage fee information to all ticket agents that receive and distribute the carrier's fare and schedule information, including Global Distribution Systems and metasearch entities. On covered carrier and ticket agent Web sites, the SNPRM would require the baggage fee information to be disclosed at the first point in a search process where a fare is listed in connection with a specific flight itinerary, adjacent to the fare. The SNPRM would permit carriers and ticket agents to allow customers to opt-out of receiving the baggage fee information when using their Web sites.transparency-of-airline-ancillary-service-feesFR-Doc-2017-00904
Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision SystemsRule2016-2871412/13/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentPrior to this final rule, persons could only use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to descend below the decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude (DA/DH or MDA) down to 100 feet … Prior to this final rule, persons could only use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to descend below the decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude (DA/DH or MDA) down to 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation (TDZE) using certain straight-in landing instrument approach procedures (IAPs). This final rule permits operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the TDZE to the runway and to land on certain straight-in IAPs under instrument flight rules (IFR). This final rule also revises and relocates the regulations that permit operators to use an EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend to 100 feet above the TDZE using certain straight-in IAPs. Additionally, this final rule addresses provisions that permit operators who conduct EFVS operations under parts 121, 125, or 135 to use EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and revises the regulations for those operators to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. This final rule establishes pilot training and recent flight experience requirements for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below the DA/DH or MDA. EFVS-equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout are required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This final rule also revises pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside field of view. The final rule takes advantage of advanced vision capabilities, thereby achieving the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it enables EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.revisions-to-operational-requirements-for-the-use-of-enhanced-flight-vision-systems-efvs-and-toFR-Doc-2016-28714
Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections IIIRule2016-2617811/03/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe Department of Transportation is issuing a third ``Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections'' final rule to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment as follows: Expanding the pool of reporting c … The Department of Transportation is issuing a third ``Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections'' final rule to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment as follows: Expanding the pool of reporting carriers for service quality data; requiring reporting carriers to include service quality data for their domestic scheduled flights operated by their code-share partners; enhancing the Department's code-share disclosure regulation to codify the statutory requirement that carriers and ticket agents must disclose any code-share arrangements on their Web sites on the first display presented in response to a search of a requested itinerary for each itinerary involving a code-share operation; and prohibiting undisclosed biasing based on carrier identity by carriers and ticket agents in any electronic displays of the fare, schedule or availability information of multiple carriers. The amendments to the reporting requirements in this rule will ensure that the Department obtains and provides to the public expanded and enhanced service quality data from the airlines. The provision to strengthen the Department's code-share disclosure rule will also enhance air travel consumer protection. Additionally, this final rule corrects certain drafting errors and makes minor changes to the Department's second Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections rule to better reflect the Department's intent. Other topics covered by the proposed rule that are not addressed by this final rule will be addressed in two separate rulemakings. Specifically, the Department will be issuing a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) to seek additional information on the disclosure of fees for basic ancillary services to consumers at all points of sale. The remaining topics discussed in the 2014 notice of proposed rulemaking (e.g., customer service commitments by large ticket agents, prohibition on post-purchase price increases for ancillary services) will be addressed in another final rule that the Department plans to issue at a later date.enhancing-airline-passenger-protections-iiiFR-Doc-2016-26178
Incorporation by Reference of ICAO Annex 2; Removal of Outdated North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance SpecificationsProposed Rule2016-2279809/29/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis rulemaking proposes to harmonize the FAA's regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO's NAT Region i … This rulemaking proposes to harmonize the FAA's regulations regarding the North Atlantic (NAT) Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications (MNPS) with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). ICAO's NAT Region is transitioning from the decades-old MNPS navigation specification to a more modern, Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) specification. This proposed rule would also correct and update the incorporation by reference of ICAO Annex 2 in the FAA's regulations.incorporation-by-reference-of-icao-annex-2-removal-of-outdated-north-atlantic-minimum-navigationFR-Doc-2016-22798
MU-2B Series Airplane Training Requirements UpdateRule2016-2135609/07/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis action relocates and updates the content of SFAR No. 108 to the newly created subpart N of part 91 in order to improve the safety of operating the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) MU-2B series airplane. SFAR No. 108 will be elimi … This action relocates and updates the content of SFAR No. 108 to the newly created subpart N of part 91 in order to improve the safety of operating the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) MU-2B series airplane. SFAR No. 108 will be eliminated from the Code of Federal Regulations on November 7, 2017, after which time all MU-2B operators must comply with this subpart. The FAA is relocating the training program from the SFAR No. 108 appendices to advisory material in order to allow the FAA to update policy while ensuring significant training adjustments still go through notice-and-comment rulemaking. The FAA is also correcting and updating several inaccurate maneuver profiles to reflect current FAA training philosophy and adding new FAA procedures not previously part of the MU-2B training under SFAR No. 108. This rule will require all MU-2B training programs to meet the requirements of this subpart and to be approved by the FAA to ensure safety is maintained. As a result of this action, operators, training providers, and safety officials will have more timely access to standardized, accurate training material.mu-2b-series-airplane-training-requirements-updateFR-Doc-2016-21356
Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board AircraftRule2016-1191805/24/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis final rule replaces the existing process by which the Federal Aviation Administration (Agency or FAA) approves portable oxygen concentrators (POC) for use on board aircraft in air carrier operations, commercial operations … This final rule replaces the existing process by which the Federal Aviation Administration (Agency or FAA) approves portable oxygen concentrators (POC) for use on board aircraft in air carrier operations, commercial operations, and certain other operations using large aircraft. The FAA currently assesses each POC make and model on a case-by-case basis and if the FAA determines that a particular POC is safe for use on board an aircraft, the FAA conducts rulemaking to identify the specific POC model in an FAA regulation. This final rule replaces the current process and allows passengers to use a POC on board an aircraft if the POC satisfies certain acceptance criteria and bears a label indicating conformance with the acceptance criteria. The labeling requirement only affects POCs intended for use on board aircraft that were not previously approved for use on aircraft by the FAA. Additionally, this rulemaking will eliminate redundant operational requirements and paperwork requirements related to the physician's statement. As a result, this rulemaking will reduce burdens for POC manufacturers, passengers who use POCs while traveling, and affected aircraft operators. This final rule also makes conforming amendments to the Department of Transportation's (Department or DOT) rule implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require carriers to accept all POC models that meet FAA acceptance criteria as detailed in this rule.acceptance-criteria-for-portable-oxygen-concentrators-used-on-board-aircraftFR-Doc-2016-11918
Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical AmendmentRule2015-3299801/04/2016DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally requ … The FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally required without notice and comment that if a certificate holder conducting part 135 operations who has voluntarily chosen and been authorized to comply with the part 121 training and qualification requirements, a pilot serving as a second in command in part 135 for that certificate holder is required to have an airline transport pilot certificate and an aircraft type rating. This document corrects those errors and makes several additional miscellaneous corrections to part 61 and a cross-reference error in part 121.pilot-certification-and-qualification-requirements-for-air-carrier-operations-technical-amendmentFR-Doc-2015-32998
Acceptance Criteria for Portable Oxygen Concentrators Used On Board AircraftProposed Rule2014-2196409/19/2014DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis rulemaking would replace Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 with acceptance criteria for portable oxygen concentrators to be used by passengers in air carrier operations, commercial operations and certain other ope … This rulemaking would replace Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 106 with acceptance criteria for portable oxygen concentrators to be used by passengers in air carrier operations, commercial operations and certain other operations using large aircraft. Currently, the agency assesses each portable oxygen concentrator on a case-by-case basis to determine whether it is safe for use on board aircraft. If the agency determines that a portable oxygen concentrator is safe for use on board aircraft, the specific model is identified in regulations. This rulemaking would replace the burdensome approval process with acceptance criteria and a requirement for manufacturers to demonstrate compliance by affixing a label on the exterior of the portable oxygen concentrator applied in a manner that ensures it will remain affixed for the life of the device. The proposed acceptance criteria and labeling requirement would only affect portable oxygen concentrators intended for use on board aircraft. Portable oxygen concentrators currently approved for use on board aircraft would not be affected by this proposal and will be listed in this rule as approved. This rulemaking would also eliminate redundant requirements and paperwork requirements that are not necessary for aviation safety thereby reducing burdens for portable oxygen concentrator manufacturers, passengers who use portable oxygen concentrators while traveling, and aircraft operators conducting air carrier operations, commercial operations or certain operations using large aircraft.acceptance-criteria-for-portable-oxygen-concentrators-used-on-board-aircraftFR-Doc-2014-21964
Transparency of Airline Ancillary Fees and Other Consumer Protection IssuesProposed Rule2014-1199305/23/2014DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe Department is seeking comment on a number of proposals to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment, including a proposal to clarify and codify the Department's interpretation of the statut … The Department is seeking comment on a number of proposals to enhance protections for air travelers and to improve the air travel environment, including a proposal to clarify and codify the Department's interpretation of the statutory definition of ``ticket agent.'' By codifying the Department's interpretation, the Department intends to ensure that all entities that manipulate fare, schedule, and availability information in response to consumer inquiries and receive a form of compensation are adhering to all of the Department's consumer protection requirements that are applicable to ticket agents such as the full-fare advertising rule and the code-share disclosure rule. This NPRM also proposes to require airlines and ticket agents to disclose at all points of sale the fees for certain basic ancillary services associated with the air transportation consumers are buying or considering buying. Currently, some consumers may be unable to understand the true cost of travel while searching for airfares, due to insufficient information concerning fees for ancillary services. The Department is addressing this problem by proposing that carriers share real-time, accurate fee information for certain optional services with ticket agents. Other proposals in this NPRM to enhance airline passenger protections include: Expanding the pool of ``reporting'' carriers; requiring enhanced reporting by mainline carriers for their domestic code-share partner operations; requiring large travel agents to adopt minimum customer service standards; codifying the statutory requirement that carriers and ticket agents disclose any airline code-share arrangements on their Web sites; and prohibiting unfair and deceptive practices such as undisclosed biasing in schedule and fare displays and post-purchase price increases. The Department is also considering whether to require ticket agents to disclose the carriers whose tickets they sell in order to avoid having consumers mistakenly believe they are searching all possible flight options for a particular city-pair market when in fact there may be other options available. Additionally, this NPRM would correct drafting errors and make minor changes to the Department's second Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections rule to conform to guidance issued by the Department's Office of Aviation Enforcement and Proceedings (Enforcement Office) regarding its interpretation of the rule.transparency-of-airline-ancillary-fees-and-other-consumer-protection-issuesFR-Doc-2014-11993
Extension of Effective Date for the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations Final RuleRule2014-0903404/21/2014DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe FAA is delaying the effective date of the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations final rule published on February 21, 2014. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to revise … The FAA is delaying the effective date of the Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter Operations final rule published on February 21, 2014. In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to revise the helicopter air ambulance, commercial helicopter, and general aviation helicopter operating requirements. The April 22, 2014 effective date does not provide an adequate amount of time for the affected certificate holders to implement the new requirements. By extending the effective date to April 22, 2015, the affected certificate holders will have sufficient time to implement the new requirements. This action will only affect the effective date of the provisions of the rule scheduled to take effect April 22, 2014. Other provisions in the rule with specified compliance dates will not be affected.extension-of-effective-date-for-the-helicopter-air-ambulance-commercial-helicopter-and-part-91FR-Doc-2014-09034
Helicopter Air Ambulance, Commercial Helicopter, and Part 91 Helicopter OperationsRule2014-0368902/21/2014DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis final rule addresses helicopter air ambulance, commercial helicopter, and general aviation helicopter operations. To address an increase in fatal helicopter air ambulance accidents, the FAA is implementing new operational proced … This final rule addresses helicopter air ambulance, commercial helicopter, and general aviation helicopter operations. To address an increase in fatal helicopter air ambulance accidents, the FAA is implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements for helicopter air ambulance operations. This final rule also increases safety for commercial helicopter operations by revising requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternate airports. It increases weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations. Many of these requirements address National Transportation Safety Board safety recommendations, and are already found in FAA guidance. Today's changes are intended to provide certificate holders and pilots with additional tools and procedures that will aid in preventing accidents.helicopter-air-ambulance-commercial-helicopter-and-part-91-helicopter-operationsFR-Doc-2014-03689
Minimum Altitudes for Use of AutopilotsRule2014-0212302/03/2014DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis rulemaking amends and harmonizes minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes; it also enables the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of … This rulemaking amends and harmonizes minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes; it also enables the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of current and future autopilots, flight guidance systems, and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) guidance systems while protecting the continued use of legacy systems at current autopilot minimum use altitudes. Additionally, this final rule implements a performance-based approach, using the certified capabilities of autopilot systems as established by the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or as approved by the Administrator.minimum-altitudes-for-use-of-autopilotsFR-Doc-2014-02123
Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier Operations; Technical AmendmentRule2013-3060312/24/2013DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013 (78 FR 42324). In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unint … The FAA is correcting a final rule published on July 15, 2013 (78 FR 42324). In that rule, the FAA amended its regulations to create new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The FAA unintentionally required without notice and comment a pilot serving as a second in command in part 135 commuter operations to have an airline transport pilot certificate and an aircraft type rating, and a pilot in command in part 135 commuter operations to have 1,000 hours of air carrier experience. This document corrects those errors and makes several additional miscellaneous corrections.pilot-certification-and-qualification-requirements-for-air-carrier-operations-technical-amendmentFR-Doc-2013-30603
Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and Automated Kiosks at U.S. AirportsRule2013-2674911/12/2013DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe Department of Transportation is amending its rules implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require U.S. air carriers and foreign air carriers to make their Web sites that market air transportation to the general public i … The Department of Transportation is amending its rules implementing the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to require U.S. air carriers and foreign air carriers to make their Web sites that market air transportation to the general public in the United States accessible to individuals with disabilities. In addition, the Department is amending its rule that prohibits unfair and deceptive practices and unfair methods of competition to require ticket agents that are not small businesses to disclose and offer Web-based fares to passengers who indicate that they are unable to use the agents' Web sites due to a disability. DOT is also requiring U.S. and foreign air carriers to ensure that kiosks meet detailed accessibility design standards specified in this rule until a total of at least 25 percent of automated kiosks in each location at the airport meet these standards. In addition, the Department is amending its rule implementing the Rehabilitation Act to require U.S. airport operators meet the same accessibility standards.nondiscrimination-on-the-basis-of-disability-in-air-travel-accessibility-of-web-sites-and-automatedFR-Doc-2013-26749
Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier OperationsRule2013-1684907/15/2013DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis action creates new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. As a result of this action, a second in command (first officer) in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations must now hold a … This action creates new certification and qualification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. As a result of this action, a second in command (first officer) in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations must now hold an airline transport pilot certificate and an airplane type rating for the aircraft to be flown. An airline transport pilot certificate requires that a pilot be 23 years of age and have 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. Pilots with fewer than 1,500 flight hours may qualify for a restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate beginning at 21 years of age if they are a military-trained pilot, have a bachelor's degree with an aviation major, or have an associate's degree with an aviation major. The restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate will also be available to pilots with 1,500 flight hours who are at least 21 years of age. This restricted privileges airline transport pilot certificate allows a pilot to serve as second in command in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations not requiring more than two pilot flightcrew members. This rule also retains the second-class medical certification requirement for a second in command in part 121 operations. Pilots serving as an air carrier pilot in command (captain) must have, in addition to an airline transport pilot certificate, at least 1,000 flight hours in air carrier operations. This rule also adds to the eligibility requirements for an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane category multiengine class rating or an airline transport pilot certificate obtained concurrently with a type rating. To receive an airline transport pilot certificate with a multiengine class rating a pilot must have 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and must have completed a new FAA-approved Airline Transport Pilot Certification Training Program. This new training program will include academic coursework and training in a flight simulation training device. These requirements will ensure that a pilot has the proper qualifications, training, and experience before entering an air carrier environment as a pilot flightcrew member.pilot-certification-and-qualification-requirements-for-air-carrier-operationsFR-Doc-2013-16849
Revisions to Operational Requirements for the Use of Enhanced Flight Vision Systems (EFVS) and to Pilot Compartment View Requirements for Vision SystemsProposed Rule2013-1345406/11/2013DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe FAA is proposing to permit operators to use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to the runway and land on certain straight-in … The FAA is proposing to permit operators to use an Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) in lieu of natural vision to continue descending from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to the runway and land on certain straight-in instrument approach procedures under instrument flight rules (IFR). This proposal would also permit certain operators using EFVS-equipped aircraft to dispatch, release, or takeoff under IFR, and to initiate and continue an approach, when the destination airport weather is below authorized visibility minimums for the runway of intended landing. Under this proposal, pilot training, recent flight experience, and proficiency would be required for operators who use EFVS in lieu of natural vision to descend below decision altitude, decision height, or minimum descent altitude. EFVS- equipped aircraft conducting operations to touchdown and rollout would be required to meet additional airworthiness requirements. This proposal would also revise pilot compartment view certification requirements for vision systems using a transparent display surface located in the pilot's outside view. The proposal would take advantage of advanced vision capabilities thereby achieving the NextGen goals of increasing access, efficiency, and throughput at many airports when low visibility is the limiting factor. Additionally, it would enable EFVS operations in reduced visibilities on a greater number of approach procedure types while maintaining an equivalent level of safety.revisions-to-operational-requirements-for-the-use-of-enhanced-flight-vision-systems-efvs-and-toFR-Doc-2013-13454
Minimum Altitudes for Use of AutopilotsProposed Rule2012-2927412/04/2012DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThe FAA proposes to amend and harmonize minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes. The proposed rule would enable the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capa … The FAA proposes to amend and harmonize minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes. The proposed rule would enable the operational use of advanced autopilot and navigation systems by incorporating the capabilities of new and future autopilots, flight guidance systems, and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) guidance systems while protecting the continued use of legacy systems at current autopilot minimum use altitudes. The proposed rule would accomplish this through a performance-based approach, using the certified capabilities of autopilot systems as established by the Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) or as approved by the Administrator.minimum-altitudes-for-use-of-autopilotsFR-Doc-2012-29274
Pilot Certification and Qualification Requirements for Air Carrier OperationsProposed Rule2012-462702/29/2012DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATIONTransportation DepartmentThis action would create new certification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The proposal would require a second in command (first officer) in part 121 operations to hold an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate an … This action would create new certification requirements for pilots in air carrier operations. The proposal would require a second in command (first officer) in part 121 operations to hold an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate and a type rating for the aircraft to be flown. The FAA proposes to allow pilots with an aviation degree or military pilot experience to obtain an ATP certificate with restricted privileges with fewer than 1,500 hours total time as a pilot. The proposal also would require at least 1,000 flight hours in air carrier operations in order to serve as a pilot in command in part 121 air carrier operations. Finally, the FAA is proposing to modify an ATP certificate with an airplane category multiengine class rating or type rating to require 50 hours of multiengine flight experience and completion of a new FAA-approved ATP Certification Training Program for a Multiengine Class Rating or Type Rating that would include academic training and training in a flight simulation training device. These proposed requirements would ensure that pilots have proper qualifications and experience in difficult operational conditions and in a multicrew environment prior to serving as pilot flightcrew members in air carrier operations.pilot-certification-and-qualification-requirements-for-air-carrier-operationsFR-Doc-2012-4627
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